Essex Corpora

Several corpora are owned and managed by researchers in our department, and used for internal research projects, listed below. Information on external corpora we have access to at Essex are here,

SEA Corpus

http://orb.essex.ac.uk/lg/seacorpus/

The South East Anglian Corpus consists of over 350 digital sociolinguistic interviews. While a majority of the speakers are from the SEA region, the corpus also contains recordings from other UK sites, including the Isle of Wight, Scotland, Peterborough, and Northern Ireland.

Eisenbeiss corpus

https://corpus1.mpi.nl/ds/asv/;jsessionid=61F22C0F05E35EF331E603C0A846B3FD?0

 The Eisenbeiss corpus provides data from unimpaired monolingual German children and adults and involves a combination of spontaneous speech and semi-structured elicitaion games. Parts of the data have been transcribed in CHAT-format and video-linked using ELAN. The corpus has been funded funded by the MPI society and is hosted in their archive. Further details here.

French Learner Language Oral Corpora

www.flloc.soton.ac.uk

Each corpus included in the FLLOC database is accompanied by a project description. This includes: details of the corpus owners and the learners; information about the tasks used; an explanation of any distinctive transcription conventions used; an explanation of transcript headers (which enable searches to be carried out on the database); a summary of the files contained in the database, and of the organising principles used for each dataset.

Spanish Learner Language Oral Corpora

www.splloc.soton.ac.uk

The overall goal of the Spanish Learner Language Oral Corpora (SPLLOC) programme is to promote research on the acquisition of Spanish as L2, by:

  • Establishing a small scale, high quality database of spoken learner Spanish;
  • Making this resource freely available to other bona fide researchers;
  • Undertaking substantive research into L2 Spanish.

 

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One thought on “Essex Corpora

  1. Pingback: Essex Corpus Linguistics Collective | Experimental Linguistics in the Field

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